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Creating your first JMeter Test - 3rd JMeter training tutorial

This is the third video training tutorial for JMeter. You can watch watch all  JMeter training video sessions online. This session covers -

            Record JMeter test using badboy
            Import jmx file to JMeter
Loop Controller
Analyze Sampler recorded from Badboy
Rename Sampler
Add Response Assertion to mercury Registration sampler
Add Listeners - View Results in Tree and Agreegate Report
Run test and analyze results
            Modify Response Assertion to raise false alarm and run test again

JMeter video Training Tutorial can be watched online. If you have any question then please post it in comment section.

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